Coasts

Protecting Connecticut's coasts for birds and people

American Oystercatcher. Photo: Walker Golder/Audubon

Connecticut’s coastlines and associated marshes, islands, and beaches are being squeezed by rising sea levels and human development. The ecosystem is critical to protecting birds and people, and we need your help to keep it healthy.

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MAKING A DIFFERENCE FROM SAND TO SKY

More than 23 million people live within a 50-mile radius of Long Island Sound, making this landscape one of the most densely populated regions in the United States. It’s also a critically important area for vulnerable birds like the Piping Plover, Roseate Tern, American Oystercatcher, and Saltmarsh Sparrow.

To help at-risk species, our conservation staff, volunteers, and partners are protecting and restoring the places birds need to safely rest during migration and raise their young.

In doing so, we can also help communities prepare for and feel less of an impact from extreme coastal events.

Protect Shore-Nesting Birds
Coasts

Protect Shore-Nesting Birds

Together, we can #ShareTheShore to help birds nest and raise their young successfully.

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Share the Love, #ShareTheShore
Coasts

Share the Love, #ShareTheShore

Join the effort to protect shore-nesting birds! Together, we can make waves for safer beaches.

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Building a Stronger, Resilient Connecticut Coast
Coasts

Building a Stronger, Resilient Connecticut Coast

Rising sea levels, stronger storms, and human development are squeezing salt marshes and beaches across the Long Island Sound and Atlantic Ocean coastlines.

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Birds That Depend on Our Coast

News from the Coast

This Oystercatcher Couple Proves There’s No Wrong Way to Love
Coasts

This Oystercatcher Couple Proves There’s No Wrong Way to Love

Banding has enabled us to track the seasonal love affair of this bird couple by observing their movements across the years.

Watch: Coastal Resilience Webinar
Nature Notes

Watch: Coastal Resilience Webinar

Sea level rise, salt marsh restoration, and more—hear about the challenges we face and the work Audubon is doing to make our coasts more resilient for birds and people.

2019 Shorebird Numbers Reflect a Safer Shoreline
Coasts

Successful 2019 Nesting Season for Threatened Shorebirds

— Season recap reveals new details about where American Oystercatchers migrate, and historically low numbers for Least Terns.
Coastal Resilience and the Future of Connecticut's Coast
Advocacy

Coastal Resilience and the Future of Connecticut's Coast

Our coasts are changing, but we can help keep them resilient to benefit birds and people.

American Oystercatcher Nest Survives Washout, and Other Firsts
Coasts

American Oystercatcher Nest Survives Washout, and Other Firsts

Audubon Connecticut’s 2019 coastal field season saw many successes for this iconic shorebird species.

Connecticut's First Living Shoreline is Thriving at Stratford Point
Coasts

Connecticut's First Living Shoreline is Thriving at Stratford Point

Audubon Connecticut and partners are working to improve resiliency of the coast for birds and local people.

New Insights into Connecticut's American Oystercatcher Population
Coasts

New Insights into Connecticut's American Oystercatcher Population

In just one year, a new banding program has already increased our understanding of the behavior and movements of Connecticut’s American Oystercatcher breeding population.

Spotted in the Bahamas: Pink Flag 2E
Coasts

Spotted in the Bahamas: Pink Flag 2E

While just over 60 pairs of Piping Plovers nest in Connecticut, one keeps making herself known.

Connecticut's Audubon Alliance for Coastal Waterbirds
Coasts

Volunteer to Save Birds

Train to become a volunteer beach steward! You'll help monitor nesting coastal birds and educate the public.

Eagle Scouts Dig-in to Habitat Restoration in West Haven
Conservation

Eagle Scouts Dig-in to Habitat Restoration in West Haven

Through teamwork and dedication, two brothers made a difference for birds, other wildlife, and the community at the Sandy Point Beach & Bird Sanctuary

How you can help, right now