Nature Notes

Migration Monday: Spotted Salamander Eggs

Migration Monday: Spotted Salamander Eggs

Animal migration doesn't only take place by region—animals like the Spotted Salamander migrate on a smaller scale from woodland habitat to ponds and vernal pools in early spring. View this video by Greenwich Audubon Center to learn more.
Audubon U

Audubon U

Learn more about birds and nature from wherever you are
Getting Started with Native Plants

Getting Started with Native Plants

— Live in Connecticut and want to attract birds, bees, and other pollinators to your home or community? Start here.
Watch: Coastal Resilience Webinar

Watch: Coastal Resilience Webinar

— Sea level rise, salt marsh restoration, and more—hear about the challenges we face and the work Audubon is doing to make our coasts more resilient for birds and people.
Berries for Birds

Berries for Birds

10 great native shrubs that supply amazing fall beauty as well as food and shelter for our feathered friends
What To Do With an Injured or Orphaned Bird

What To Do With an Injured or Orphaned Bird

Guidelines on what to do if you encounter injured, sick, or orphaned birds.
Connecticut Birds in the Caribbean

Connecticut Birds in the Caribbean

Are you a Connecticut "snowbird?" Look for Northern Waterthrush, Western Sandpipers, Ovenbirds, Blue-winged Warblers, and American Redstarts in the tropics!
Common Loon

Common Loon

This large waterbird is a majestic sight when spotted gracefully gliding in Long Island Sound in winter. Can you imagine a winter in which this species did not return to Connecticut? It’s possible if we do not work to maintain the fish populations that it relies on through the Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA)—an important piece of legislation that is currently under threat.
Common Raven

Common Raven

Although not so common in Connecticut just 25 years ago, this adaptable species can now be found across the state. They are particularly fond of hilly areas with cliff faces.
Roseate Spoonbill

Roseate Spoonbill

A Connecticut first! Although common in places like the Everglades, this sub-tropical species has made an unprecedented appearance along the shore of Connecticut. Keep an eye out, you'll know if you see it!